Bookshttp://web.me.com/unknown-account/web_pages_to_8_15/Books_2.html
ContactContact.html
FAQFAQ.html
Details/OrderOrder.html
Animal KitsAnimals.html
Doll KitsDolls.html
HomeHome.html

HISTORY

Bookshttp://web.me.com/unknown-account/web_pages_to_8_15/Books_2.html
ContactContact.html
FAQFAQ.html
Details/OrderOrder.html
Animal KitsAnimals.html
Doll KitsDolls.html
HomeHome.html

Vintage, Retro, whatever you like to call them, this is the story of a collection of rag toy kits that first started their life in Brighton nearly

fifty years ago.

A long time ago, in a land far away.....or, to

be more precise, England in 1965, the first toy

was created.  A little cat for a new baby.


The little cat became the inspiration for more cats,

Lucky Nancy, Jolly Jack and their kittens - Sage and Onion.  Kits that doubled as

teatowels or wall-hangings for those people who couldn’t get round to making them up.


This was the Swinging Sixties  and everything was a little mad. 

Gear, in Carnaby Street, London, wanted the cats, then a lion and unicorn, then a British bulldog.  They sold  faster than we could print them in the tiny back

bedroom of our Brighton terrace house.


Newspapers and magazines wanted Christmas special offers - owls and animals

and quails and puppies and dolls.  Then there were more special offers, all the year round.  When the offers were over the toys returned home to be sold by mail order

and in shops around the world.


The range grew - toy kits for publishers and charities, museums and institutions.

The demand seemed insatiable.


But eventually things began to change.  The craft scene that was so strong in the seventies and early eighties ran out of steam.  The culture of making things

by hand was being replaced by Ready-Made.


Relocation to Australia.

Designing toys gave way to writing and illustrating.  The kits

ticked over very quietly and gently.  But they never entirely went away.


And then came the Internet.   Half a century after they first saw

the light of day the kits are now back for a new generation who tell me how their

mothers and grannies made my toys for them when they were small.

And now they want to make them for their own children,

as I did for mine, all those years ago.


The little cat that started it all sits on my book-shelf, gazing at me thoughtfully.

She is probably as surprised as I am at the strange journey she and I,

and her many offspring, have made together.